Reflections on public pain and collective rage at the end of 2016

I've cried in public more times than I can count. I've cried openly on the bus after saying goodbye to a loved one, I've cried at parties, and I've cried at work. Yesterday I sat in a coffee shop and told a trusted friend about a bunch of shit that I've been going through lately, … Continue reading Reflections on public pain and collective rage at the end of 2016

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If a cyclist yells at a driver, it’s because they’re afraid they’re going to die.

On Friday morning, I biked to work. This summer I have cycled about two or three times a week. It's about 15 minutes to bike from my house, most of it down a six-lane major street that is busy by Winnipeg standards but would seem relatively calm to anyone from Vancouver, Ottawa or Toronto.  Friday … Continue reading If a cyclist yells at a driver, it’s because they’re afraid they’re going to die.

Why I don’t believe in “self care” (and how to make it obsolete)

Someone asked me recently what my favourite self care strategies are. It seemed like a reasonable question until I realized that I had no idea what the answer is. I drew a complete blank. Which is weird, because I'm a mental health activist and I spend a lot of time thinking about how to take care … Continue reading Why I don’t believe in “self care” (and how to make it obsolete)

Reflections on the city, leaving home and looking for community

This week I am visiting Vancouver, BC, my hometown, and riding the waves of emotion that always come with visiting home for me: excitement, anxiety, nostalgia, and familiarity. All tied with vivid memories, some of actual events and some of dreams for the future that I no longer hold. This trip comes with a new … Continue reading Reflections on the city, leaving home and looking for community